• Californians across the political spectrum voted to pass Proposition 22, affirming the importance of flexible work and the need to include new benefits and protections for gig-workers.
  • It is time to push forward, focused on better, permanent, collaborative solutions for millions of workers across the country.
  • Tony Xu is the co-founder and CEO of DoorDash.
  • This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

2020 has been a year of enormous upheaval. So many of the decisions we faced have been incredibly consequential, shaping the kind of future we want for this country. In one of those decisions, voters in California chose to embrace a new future for work in a decision that has taken on even greater importance in light of our nation’s present challenges.

By passing Proposition 22 with 58% of the vote, Californians affirmed the importance of flexible work and, crucially, the need to update that framework to include new benefits and protections. They rejected an approach that could have eliminated a critical source of supplemental income for millions of Californians, and instead ushered in a modern-day approach that meets the needs of today’s workforce.

This is a signal to the rest of America that change is vital and now is the time for innovative solutions across the country.

Flexible work is crucial to the future of the US economy

Flexible work opportunities with low barriers to entry are more crucial than ever, enabling people—particularly in communities that have been disproportionately impacted by the pandemic—to earn money literally at the touch of a button as unemployment rates skyrocketed throughout the crisis.

 As the CEO of DoorDash, I saw this first-hand: since the first stay-at-home orders went into effect in mid-March, 1.7 million new Dashers joined the platform and together with existing Dashers earned nearly $3.5 billion during the first six and a half months of the pandemic. Importantly, $2.1 billion of that total was earned by Dashers who live in zip codes with above average Black and/or Latinx representation, delivering meaningful income to communities throughout the US.

I believe we need to build upon what began in California to find innovative solutions elsewhere. And that’s why we’re taking the lead and partnering with workers, policymakers, and a variety of stakeholders to build a framework for today’s workforce. 

It’s a vision that reflects what Dashers have told us works best for them—not the workforce of 75 years ago.

Unlike other gig platforms where people may work more hours, 91% of Dashers work fewer than 10 hours per week, with an average of four or fewer hours. More than 4 out of 5 Dashers say that gig work is not their main source of income, and more than 3 out of 4 Dashers say they have another job or are in school. It’s clear: Dashing, and work like it, is filling a critical need for supplemental income in our country, whenever and wherever convenient for the worker.

Instead of getting caught in the no-win dichotomy of employment versus independent contracting, we need a third way that recognizes that this new approach to working is here to stay. That’s because workers want it and it provides the legal protections and benefits they deserve —it’s as simple as that. 76% of Dashers indicate that Dashing has had a positive impact on their ability to provide for themselves and their family. We need a portable, proportional, and flexible framework that is easy to access and allows app-based workers to maintain their independence, while also providing new benefits.

  • Portable: Benefits should be connected to the individual so workers can move from platform to platform, taking their benefits with them without interruption or loss of funding.
  • Proportional: Benefits such as accident coverage and on-the-job injuries should be able to scale up in proportion to the engagement a worker has with a company. And protections against discrimination and harrassment should exist for every worker in America—full stop.
  • Flexible: Allow workers to choose the benefits they want or need, accounting for the different ways people work with app-based platforms like DoorDash.

Prop 22 is one example that works for California, but each state is different, and this is a nationwide issue that requires a thoughtful and tailored approach. We are committed to working with lawmakers and other stakeholders across the country and across the political spectrum to develop solutions that reflect the multiplicity of needs of workers in the 21st century economy.

Now is the time to push forward, focused on better, permanent, collaborative solutions for millions of workers across the country, and DoorDash is committed to leading that effort.

Tony Xu is the CEO of DoorDash.

This is an opinion column. The thoughts expressed are those of the author(s).

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