Pros and Cons of Fashion

Fashion can be connected almost with every part of our life. As it comes to the matter of way we look it sometimes means the same as being accepted by society or just a specific group of people. We are not aware of wearing the same cloths as other people not only to look good for ourselves but more to gain others people love. Is it ok?

Fashion can be a really great way to become part of the particular group of people. When someone looks at our clothes and admire them we are getting more self-confident and – what’s most important – we are being noticed and people want to be like us. Especially if the clothes are in elegant and stylish style.

A good impact of fashion on our mood is almost obvious. The joy we feel when looking good and wearing quality and fashionable clothes is huge. It can make us more self-confident and make us feel better in many stressful situations. We can name here wedding, interview or even engagement party. Some standards in appearance that we are part of can make us feel on good place.

So, we named so many advantages of fashion here. But are there any disadvantages? Like most of things in life nothing can be ideal the same is with fashion. The same reasons that make fashion something good in our life make it something that may lead to tearing society apart. When we want to impress people blindly in love with trends or just talk with them, we can have a bit problem here.

“Don’t judge the book by its cover” we would want to add here. If the only way of evaluating people is to judge them by their look and trendy cloths the fashion is misunderstanding. But if it is just looking good and fashion is our hobby we should go for it!…

Eva Peron – The Princess Diana of Argentina?

The latest news about the return of the famous Broadway musical Evita with Ricky Martin in a starring role has the entertainment press whipped into a frenzy. However, many of us are still wondering who Evita is, what she did, and why she deserves her own musical.

Maria Eva Duarte de Peron (1919-1952) was the second wife and political partner of President Juan Peron (1895’1974) of Argentina. She’s also popularly known by the affectionate Spanish diminutive Evita, which translates into “Little Eva”. Still a hugely popular figure in Argentina and a worldwide icon due to books, movies and musicals based on her life, many consider her comparable to another global superstar, England’s Princess Diana. Here we look at the similarities and differences of both women to see if the comparison is justified.

It’s fair to say that both Evita and Diana, despite living almost 50 years apart on different continents, had similarities;

– Both married powerful men, Diana with Prince Charles and Evita with Colonel Juan Peron. They met in 1943 when Peron had assumed the post of secretary of labor and social welfare in the military government that had recently come to power. Two years later they were married in 1945 when Evita assisted Peron with his release from prison after his incarceration by military opposition. Peron’s presidency in 1946 assumed soon after, and Evita’s close relationship with Peron gave her access to a lot of power.

– Both Diana and Evita shared an affinity for the poor and sick; during the 1946 Presidential campaign Evita directed her efforts towards the “descamisados” (shirtless poor) and her efforts for woman’s suffrage saw laws passed in 1947 that allowed women to vote in the 1951 elections for the first time in history. She also devoted several hours every day to meeting with poor people and visiting hospitals, orphanages, and factories. Additionally, she supervised the newly created Ministry of Health, which built many new hospitals and established a successful program to fight different diseases.

– Much like Diana, Evita was a figure constantly in the public eye. As a result she, like Diana, was immensely fashion-conscious. Her clothes and hairstyle were avidly studied, commented upon and copied.

– Both women died young, Evita of cervical cancer at the age of 33. In both cases, there were huge outpouring of public grief. All activity in Argentina ceased; movies stopped playing; restaurants were closed and patrons were shown to the door. The crowd outside of the official presidential residence after the announcement of her death was so dense that the streets were congesting for ten blocks in each direction. The streets of Buenos Aires overflowed with flowers that were stacked in huge piles, and within one day of Evita’s death, all flower shops in Buenos Aires had sold out.

– Just as Diana’s legacy and reputation has endured after her death, Evita’s passing doesn’t seem to have stopped her international fame. In 1980, Andrew Lloyd Weber and Timothy Rice’s Musical “Evita” won a major …