Islam: The Elephant in America’s Kitchen

There is an elephant in America’s kitchen, and it’s growing every day. It’s hard to understand why people keep feeding it. Our government leader’s feed it, our church leaders feed it and the news media, well, they force feed it. The elephant even has a name. Islam.

Islam’s actions are obvious and often, and very destructive to America’s ability to move around its kitchen. In Dearborn, Michigan, known these days as Dearbornastan, a Muslim man has filed suit against Little Caesar’s Pizza. A $100 million dollar suit by the way. Little Caesar’s sin? They delivered a pizza with pepperoni allegedly containing pork, a no-no for Sharia Law adherents. Sharia Law? Yep, this Muslim man is offended. The elephant eats.

Moving from Dearborn, we go east to New York City where a 21-year-old Queens College student, a Pakistani Muslim, called police with a harrowing tale of abduction and a hate crime; they were calling him a racist name and all while branding guns. A terrible experience for anyone. Except, when the NYPD started investigating they discovered it was all a hoax. The student made it all up. The elephant has a snack.

One borough over in Brooklyn, the Brooklyn Tech High School, has a prom coming up. And again, the elephant is hungry. The Muslim students demand concessions. Prom is going to fall during Ramadan, and the Muslims will be fasting. We should note here that there are no concessions for Jewish or Christian students. But, after a meeting the Muslim Student Association, yes, there is one, the Principal agreed they would never again have Prom during Ramadan, and they will not serve food to anyone at the Prom until after 9 PM when the Muslim Fast is over. The elephant scraps up another few bites of America’s freedoms.

Let’s move south to Jacksonville, Florida as many New Yorkers do. Daniel Pipes, writing in the National Review, he cites a plaque he saw in the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens. He said he rubbed his eyes in disbelief as he read a plaque on an Islamic exhibit, celebrating the culture of the Ottoman Empire when it took over a renowned church in Istanbul. It read, “In addition to their renowned patronage of architecture, which yielded the conversion of the Church of Hagia Sophia in Istanbul into a congregational mosque… ” It struck Pipes as obscene. Was it the truth?

The Museum’s statement is far from the truth. The elephant was hungry again. As the Ottomans approached Pipes wrote the church was still thronged. The Holy Liturgy was ended, and the service of matins was being sung. At the sound of the tumult outside the huge bronze gates of the building were closed. Inside the congregation prayed for the miracle that alone could save them. They prayed in vain. It was not long before the doors were battered down. The worshippers were trapped. A few of the ancient and infirm were killed on the spot, but most of them were tied …

Flipping That House in Oregon – Big Profits Or Big Headaches?

Flipping, the real estate investment vehicle in which you purchase a property below value and soon sell it for a profit, is a very good way to generate positive cash flow. Cash flow is important if you want to pay the bills and feed the family. Flipping has become a big business. I encourage my protégées to buy and sell for a profit without getting into the rehab business if their goal is to be an investor.

In Oregon you need to be careful how you proceed with a flip. If you buy a house and sell it without doing work on it you will not butt heads with the state construction contractors board (CCB). But be careful. If you think you can buy a house, remodel it, and then sell it, you can – if you have a general contractors license or a developers license. In other words, it's regulated by the state. The purpose is to offer some semblance of protection to the consumer.

The declared mission of the CCB is:

"The Construction Contractors Board protects the public's interest relating to improvements to real property. The Board regulates construction contractors and promotes a competitive business environment through education, contractor licensing, dispute resolution, and law enforcement."

A general contracting license with allow you to do the work yourself on a house you plan to buy, fix up, and sell. A developers license will allow you to buy, hire contractors to do the rehab, and sell.

Who needs to be licensed?

According to the CCB:

Oregon law requires anyone who works for compensation in any construction activity involving improvements to real property to be licensed with the Oregon Construction Contractors Board (CCB). This includes roofing, siding, painting, carpentry, concrete, on-site appliance repair, heating and air conditioning, home inspections, tree service, plumbing, electrical, floor covering, manufactured lodging installations, land development and most other construction and repair services.

A CCB license is also required for:

* Those who purchase homes with the intent to fix them up and resell them, even if they do not perform the work themselves.
* Material suppliers that receive compensation for installing or arranging the installation of the materials.

It's not difficult to meet the requirements for a contractor or developer license. You simply take a short course that costs around $ 200 and you learn about OSHA, lien laws, and that – there's very little in it about how to be carpenter, etc. You then take a test which adds an additional $ 50 to $ 100. The test is designed, like most state tests, to be passed so the state can collect fees. You can get through it. When I was first licensed all I needed was a bond and liability insurance, which cost about $ 125 if I remember correctly, and $ 50 for the state license, and I was a contractor – no course to take and no test.

The hard part of the process now is securing liability insurance you can afford. …