SAN DIEGO (KGTV) — A mountain lion cub rescued by the San Diego Humane Society continues to make great strides in its recovery.

The Humane Society said the female cub was found by Vista Grande Fire Station firefighters near a road in Idyllwild on Sept. 2. The cub was “semiconscious, extremely emaciated, dehydrated, weak and had tremors,” according to the Humane Society.

Under the care of the Humane Society’s Project Wildlife, the cub — believed to be 14 weeks old — has made significant health progress.

Through daily fluid therapy, medications, and proper meals, the Humane Society said the cub has increased her weight from 10.5 pounds to 22 pounds.

Christine Barton, the director of Operations & Wildlife Rehabilitation at the Humane Society’s Ramona campus, said, “With each passing day, she becomes more active and responsive and, though she still has some medical issues to overcome from being in such a fragile state, we are delighted she has responded well to our treatment and are hopeful she will make a full recovery. Mountain lions are special predators and we are proud to have an expert team trusted by the state of California to care for the species.”

The Humane Society added:

“Mountain lions typically stay with their mother until they disperse to live a solitary life at around 12-18 months of age. Because it is not safe to return a young mountain lion to the wild if found injured or orphaned as a kitten, Project Wildlife has been working with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to monitor her progress and when stabilized, to ensure she has a good permanent home at a qualified facility.

San Diego Humane Society acquired the Fund for Animals Wildlife Center in Ramona on Sept. 1 from the Humane Society of the United States. This mountain lion cub is the first wildlife patient admitted at the Ramona Campus since San Diego Humane Society’s Project Wildlife took over.

Project Wildlife is one of only two licensed rehabilitation organizations that have a special agreement with the state to work with black bears and are also routinely called on to assist with other apex predators, such as mountain lions.”

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