The benefit of being and MWDBE is that various state and other governmental authorities mandate that MWDBE certified firms must receive a certain percentage, usually between 25%-40% of any prime contract that is funded by the government. For example, in New York State MWDBE Construction Management firms usually get 35% on average for some very large and lucrative public works construction projects. But as in all markets, where there is a big demand or, this case opportunity, there is also much more supply, that is, competitors.

But what if a firm looked at smaller niche markets. Markets where, while there is still opportunity, ie. government funding jobs and contracts, but a very limited range of qualified competitors. My experience concentrates on the AEC market, that is Architecture, Engineering and Construction. But there are many other markets that MWDBE firms can enter, both with the AEC industry and others as well, think education, health care, housing.

If a entrepreneur who is qualified for an MWDBE certification were to do some good research, she/he could probably find small niche markets within which millions of dollars is being spent by the government, a portion of that money is probably mandated to go to an MWDBE. Naturally, this would be somewhat limited to the person’s chosen profession, but even ambulance service contracts, in certain states, are mandated to be apportioned to MWDBE firms.

This represents a safety net available for these firms or start ups, so as to facilitate the entry into new markets. Once established in the market, then a firm can decide if it wants to expand away from the state mandated revenue pool, and become primes themselves.

The legislation behind the MWDBE regulations was put there for a purpose, to help a certain sector of the population build businesses that did government work. A smart entrepreneur could find a very lucrative business in a haystack, if they’re smart enough.

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