Mother Knows Best – The Shocking True Story That Inspired the Movie

Hatred and Disgust

Lee Goldsmith, a well respected, Boca Raton, socialite of 67 years, hated her son in law so much that she hired someone to kill him. Goldsmith, anxious to find a suitable husband for her daughter, Arleen, a Delray Beach nurse, took out an in the local paper: “Nice Jewish Girl Wants to Meet Nice Jewish Boy.” David Brownstein is the man who answered the ad, and the two became inseparable. However, Mrs. Goldsmith could not bear the thought of her daughter marrying Brownstein because he was not professional. An air conditioning auto repairman would not have been impressive enough for Goldsmith’s socialite friends, so she concocted a plan to ruin his life. According to state testimony, Goldsmith, tried everything in the book, from falsifying letters and threatening to cut Arleen out of her will, to accusations of beatings and extortion from Brownstein. But nothing would fuel her hatred more than not being able to attend her own daughter’s wedding, nor see her grandson. So she decided that it was time to have David Brownstein out of their lives for good.

The Plot

The carpet cleaner seemed like the perfect guy to ask about where to find a contract murderer. He was hired to clean the carpet in the Goldsmith’s home when Lee asked him about helping her find someone to kill her son in law. The man said he would see what he could do to help her out, and instead he informed the police of the plot and received a $750 cash reward. The police then devised a plan to trap Goldsmith into paying an undercover cop for the job. The plan was to meet near a restaurant where Lee Goldsmith would give explicit instructions on how the murder should be carried out. The intended victim would be shot in the head and have drugs planted on his body to make it look like a drug related murder. She paid Thomas Brennen $1,000 up front, and then once the death was confirmed she would pay the remaining $9,000.

On February 8, 1989, David Brownstein kissed his wife Arleen before entering work without knowing that his life was about to change forever. The police notified him of his mother in law’s plans to kill him, and he agreed to play along. The county morgue was also in on the plot. They were told to confirm the death of David Brownstein when Goldsmith called. On February 15, 1989, Brennen told Goldsmith that her son in law was dead. She then paid the balance, thanked the officer, and chuckled as she remarked how happy everyone would be “except the one in the morgue.” Undercover Police Officers videotaped Lee paying them to kill David while meeting in Lee’s CADILLAC. She told the undercover cop that she would have another job for him in six months. She wanted the mother of David Brownstein to have acid poured onto her face. She laughed and laughed as she described exactly how she wanted …

The Scottish Court Process From a Road Traffic Law Perspective

Road Traffic Solicitors in Scotland often observe that most clients charged with a serious road traffic offence share the same apprehensions about court, including the process involved and what is to be expected of them when in court. This is because most clients contesting a road traffic case such as drink driving offences, speeding offences, illegal mobile phone use, and careless or dangerous driving offences have not been to court before and is therefore unfamiliar with the preparation required and the process involved.

This article therefore has two objectives:

First it aims to provide a greater understanding of the basic elements required in the preparation, procedure and processes involved to defend a road traffic case.

Secondly, it should also provide the reader with enough information to be able to select a solicitor who truly specialises in road traffic cases. The importance of this process cannot be over stated. You only get one shot at defending your case. While there are many solicitors who might not take certain road traffic cases on because of the intricacies involved, others sadly may simply be happy to muddle there way through a case. This article provides enough information to be able to probe the experience and qualifications of any solicitor, and in particular to form your own view to verify the road traffic solicitor is really a specialist.

The article is set up in a question and answer format to help answer actual questions received from both prospective and new clients.

Q1. What is the difference between a solicitor, a lawyer and a solicitor advocate?

The Law Society of Scotland is the regulatory body for solicitors who must have a practicing certificate to represent clients in court. The term lawyer is general and more universal description of one who practices in the legal profession. The two terms are really interchangeable. A solicitor advocate however is a special class of solicitor who has been authorised by the Law Society to appear for clients in the high court of justiciary. They have been granted rights of audience after passing extensive advocacy exams. This allows them to appear in court in very serious and complex cases.

Q2. Which court am I appearing in and will there be a jury?

Most road traffic cases are dealt with either in the Sheriff court or in the Justice of the Peace Court either with a sheriff or a magistrate sitting without a jury. The more serious charges such as dangerous driving, driving whilst disqualified or drink driving will call in the sheriff court and speeding cases insurance offences, careless driving and Tachograph cases are usually raised in the justice of the peace court. In fact over the years the number of road traffic prosecutions in justice of the peace courts is forever increasing and now form the majority of cases calling in such courts throughout Scotland. Generally these cases start off by way of a summons or a citation posted or served at your home address with a date for …