Book Review – Letters To Philip: On How To Treat a Woman

It may seem chivalry and courtesy are dead. This seems to be the time for political correctness, uni-sex, and rights. Although there is some benefits on political correctness, this mode of thinking can go overboard when there is no distinction between men and women. There are certain times when chivalry and courtesy are proper manners and etiquette. One book, “Letters To Philip: On How To Treat A Woman”, is one book that explicitly discusses on how to be a gentleman by properly treating a woman.

In most cultures, there is a transition from adolescents to adulthood. In the Jewish tradition, there will be a bar mitzvah to signify the transition from a boy to a man. In certain cultures (such as in the deep South), they have debuts and sweet sixteen celebration for the female. Unfortunately, many people would signify the transition from young adult to an adult by going out with friends and getting drunk. It is a transition to be free from responsibilities rather than to be more responsible.

The book, “Letters To Philip: On How To Treat A Woman”, was written in the late sixties. It is quite a short and succinct book that is direct on how a young man (especially before getting married) should treat a woman. This is quite rare in our “modern society”. It was written by Charlie Shedd for his son. It is written as a series of letters where one letter covers a particular topic. Here are the letters with specific topics that are helpful for any young man:

* Take Charge

* Learn to be Kind

* Start at the Mirror

* Ask Her to Help You Grow

* Seven Goals for Communication

* If You Like It, Say So

* The Power of Suggestion

* How to Tell Her What You Don’t Like

* Winning by Losing

* Fragments of Devotion

* “I Can Hardly Wait to See You”

* “Late” is a Four-Letter Word

* How To Treat a Woman in Public

* How Not To Treat A Woman

* Treat Her as a Person

* A Half-Dozen “Nevers”

* And a Few “Try Not To’s”

* Some Moments are Only for Her

* Dialogue on Moods

* Troubles are For Sharing

* Fight the Good Fight

* Rural Wisdom

* Money Maxims

* Clothers, Hair, and Miscellany

* In-Laws

* Sex- The Twenty-Year Warmup

* Infidelity

* “Except the Lord Build this House”

* The Man Who Had A “Thing” About Guns.

There a lot of lessons and perspectives in a small but powerful book. This is a fantastic book on building a long-term relationship with your wife. It is about investing (not costing) value in a relationship that will reap benefits for her and for any man.…

Fidel Castro And the Cuban Revolution – 51 Years of Tyranny

1960s A Pro-Soviet Tyranny

1959-1960: Following Fidel Castro’s overthrow of the dictatorial Batista administration, a host of people, including children and women, welcomed the arrival of guerrillas, but they turned the Island — about the size of Tennessee– into a place of repression. On the other side, Raúl Castro had been hand-picked by his brother, Fidel Alejandro Castro Ruz, as the second leader of the Cuban Revolution. In the meantime, in the early years of the new regime, up to 3,200 Cubans had been slaughtered by Fidel Castro and his family. On the economic side, Castro nationalized all U.S. businesses (without compensation). In fact, these events marked the beginning of one the world’s worst undemocratic governments. Toward the end of 1960, Washington imposed an embargo on Cuba.

1960-1980: As a consequence of the totalitarian policies, over one million Cubans had fled to America (chiefly Florida), Canada, Mexico, Venezuela, Spain and Italy.

1960-1982: Inspired by the People’s Republic of China, Albania and other Communist tyrannies, Cuba’s undemocratic state had decimated the country’s tourism industry.

1960-2007: In one of Fidel Castro’s many dictatorial reforms, hemade his sister-in-law, Vilma Espín, President of the Federation of Cuban Women –a key organization on Cuba. Espín, Raúl Castro’s wife, was leader of the feminist organization until her abrupt death on June 18, 2007.However in time, she, a former Marxist guerrilla, was known as the “First Lady of the Cuban Revolution”. Over the decades of the Soviet Empire, she had strong links with radical feminist movements from Eastern Europe, Asia, Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa.

1960-2010: World-famous dancer and choreographer Alicia Alonso Martínez became one of the key women, alongside Haydée Santamaria Cuadrado, Vilma Espín Guillois, Celia Sánchez Manduley and Mireya Luis Hernández, in the Cuban Revolution. Since then, she used her fame and prestige to clean up the Island’s bad image. By the early 60s, Fidel Castro gave Alonso $200,000 to set up the Cuban National Ballet. From then on, the Ballet Nationalbecame an open door for Cuban influence in the Third World and Europe.

1961: The Island’s history took sudden turn in this year as the provisional rule declared the country a Marxist stateand began a close relationship with the Kremlin -the USSR was one of the first states to recognize Cuba’s tyranny–and their allies, including the German Democratic Republic (GDR), North Korea and Czechoslovakia. From then on, Moscow played a key role in the Cuban Revolution. Nonetheless, after Cuba became a pro-Soviet dictatorship, the political relationship between the States and the Island worsened. On January 3, 1961, the tensions between both governments came to a head as America severed diplomatic ties with the rule of Cuba.

1962: The Republic of Cuba was suspended from the Organization of American States (OAS), which was founded on April 30 1948 in Bogotá (Colombia), over its dictatorial rule.

1962- 1990: Unlike many Marxist states in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia, including Ethiopia (the world’s poorest nation), Guinea, Laos and Cambodia (Asia’s poorest country), the Island’s human development, from employment …